Northern Flickers and others
Outdoor Ontario

Northern Flickers and others

Ally · 6 · 198

Ally

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I don't know how long will a Northern flicker youngster follow his father. These two dig others nest holes and dig my neighbour's yard together.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Ally

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I thought the earthworms move like snakes, turned out to be snakes, but they are sooooo tiny, and I didn't expect Robins hunt them.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Ally

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Although a bunch of Eastern Kingbirds were active, they attack blue Jay, flickers, but I didn't get good shots because there were many wires in the neighbourhood.  I wonder this blue jay is a juvi.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Dinusaur

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Oh wow; Robin eating a snake? That's very unique. SS and I should invade the trail that you walked along, it is full of treasures.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Ally

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Quote from: "Dinusaur"
Oh wow; Robin eating a snake? That's very unique. SS and I should invade the trail that you walked along, it is full of treasures.

I wish I got to see a screech owlet. Let's trade. :D  :D  :D
Haven't seen any owl this year, and the grass was freshly cut today, so lots of birds came treasure hunting, then the rain poured.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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Treasures like seeing a thrush eating a tiny snake happens all the time but there
is seldom anyone around to see it. The thing is, nothing escapes Ally's scrutiny.
I tried to convey early on that one of the best techniques in nature photography
without even having GREAT equipment is to venture out every chance you get and
to get an alarm clock so that the adventure starts early. Ally has embraced that
philosophy and that is why a robin eating a snake has made it onto the hit-parade.

Of course, if there is anything interesting at Humber that passes under Ally's radar
then Dinu is the agent to locate it, shoot it, (stack it if necessary) and bring it to our
attention. I would only get in everyone's way if I were there ... even if I could be there.
Thankfully to all, there is no chance of that happening in my current situation.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »