It's not over yet.
Outdoor Ontario

It's not over yet.

Shortsighted

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It's not over til the fat snowman melts.
Strange bumps in the snow makes for a shadow-scape.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Dinusaur

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Very cool. You were out today in that nasty wind? Bravo.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Axeman

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Hey you took that? Nice....between the image and even thinking about taking that pic....looks like a great print!

Wait...is one of those bumps a snowy? lol
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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I'll photograph anything that captures my attention and because I habitually scrutinize my surroundings for pictorial ideas they are easy enough to identify.
Most of the time it doesn't work out to my satisfaction but there is a good deal of amusement to be had in the attempt. It can also be exhausting because a
suitable subject can be inches above the ground, over my head, anywhere. One of the first topics presented at any photography course is to be vigilant of patterns,textures and shapes in nature, or where ever they arise including in the middle of a bustling urban setting.

My first digital camera (gift), which I still have but it’s damaged is a Canon G9 point-and-shoot. It reminded me of a 60's era rangefinder in appearance and therefore I considered it to be absolutely beautiful. It has a metal alloy body and feels weighty and comfortable in my hand. I even tried to shoot birds with it although it was near impossible to get a good result. I would walk the streets of downtown Toronto looking for the very things I mentioned above. Once, while walking through Kensington Market I noticed a oil/gasoline spill on the asphalt and stopped to photograph it. It satisfied both colour and chaotic-pattern (yes I known, that is a contradiction) as criteria for a potential subject. The texture of the asphalt just added to it. After I was finished I noted that another photographer (equipped with a Hasselblatt – I kid you not) was attempting to shoot the same subject. SOMEONE WAS WATCHING ME! She was cute too.

Later that day I was shooting a REAL pattern in the form of an iron grate, actually a stack of iron grates that were deposited roadside prior to installation on Bloor Street. The iron pattern consisted of concentric rings and the iron was rusted. Pattern and colour. After I stepped away another photographer with a DSLR walked over to the grates and proceeded to repeat what I had done, just not as elegantly. Shall we say, done with less finesse. You had to be there, but I’m glad you weren’t otherwise I would have been self conscious. Anyway, the snow covered barriers looked like a potential subject and therefore …. SNAP!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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Just remembered where those shots are located re: oil stain on asphalt
and concentric iron rings mentioned in text above.


petroling the Asphalt


Concentric Oxidation


Laminar scum - accumulated at edge of melting puddle
Looks like a thin slice of wood cut by a fictional macrotome
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »