Coywolf
Outdoor Ontario

Coywolf

cairnstone

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Coywolf captured on my game camera February 1, 2016. Brampton, Ontario.



« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Walter Fisher

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Very cool capture!  Thanks for sharing.

Walter :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »
Is backyard birding our new normal?


thouc

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Nice, how do you tell the difference between a coywolf and a coyote?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Reuven_M

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The situation is very complicated, but what I say below is the currently accepted best explanation to the best of my knowledge.

There were three-four Canis species in North America pre-contact: Grey Wolves in the North and West (maybe in the East too), Western Coyotes in western prairies and deserts, and Eastern Wolves in eastern forests, with Red Wolf being a possible distinct species from the latter in the southeast.

European settlement eventually wiped out most of the wolves in the east - Eastern Wolves remain only in central Ontario (especially Algonquin Park) and Red Wolves in coastal North Carolina.

Settlement also allowed Western Coyotes to expand into the east, where they hybridised with remnant Eastern Wolves, and possibly dogs and/or Grey Wolves. This eventually resulted in a fairly stable distinct population - our Eastern Coyote.

There is still ongoing hybridisation between Grey and Eastern Wolves, and between Eastern Wolves and Eastern Coyotes, but the genepools seem to be remaining pretty separate.

There is only one kind of Canis locally - the Eastern Coyote, which is sometimes, not entirely correctly, called a Coywolf.

Unlike Western Coyotes, our local animals will at least sometimes live and hunt in packs, and take deer with some regularity.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


cairnstone

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This PBS documentary (Meet The Coywolf) focuses mostly on these animals in Toronto and southern Ontario.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=andMu4oVgyw

It's my understanding that they are neither coyotes nor wolves, but a mix. They are much larger than coyotes I have seen in western Canada, have stouter snouts and rounded ears rather than pointed ears like pure Western Coyotes.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


thouc

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Thanks Reuven for a good explanation. So the coywolf here is the same thing that most people refer to as coyotes.

According to the Wikipedia article on coywolf Eastern coyote genes consists of 10% dog, 26% wolf (lower in urban and higher in rural areas) and 64% coyote.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Axeman

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Great pix...whereabouts in Brampton did you get the pix from ? I just get such a thrill over how well wildlife can blend into urban centres....years ago I watched a pair of coyotes cross Bloor St. in Bloor West village...

I had a coyote kill a deer about 70 m from my front door a few years ago...it happened quickly...I didn't see the kill but it happened between finishing my first cup of coffee in the a.m. and making my second cup...deer was there in the snow...dead...entrails were out and the choice organs were eaten...no sign of coyote...I placed a trail cam in front of the kill and the only pix it took were of me taking pictures....but the lone coyote did come back to feed on it's kill....

The coyote / coywolf debate is far from over but there is no denying that the coyotes in eastern NA are larger than elsewhere in NA...there is a researcher at Brock who believes that there are no "pure" coyotes left in Ontario and that every animal has some mix of coyote/wolf or coyote/dog or all 3...but the term coywolf in most circumstances does not mean that one parent is wolf and one coyote...simply that the gene pool is compromised in the pure sense...the hybridization is a curious thing given the reaction of timber wolves to coyotes and the reaction of coyotes to dogs...I would have figured that the fact that wolves eat coyotes and coyotes eat dogs would be a pretty effective reproductive isolating mechanism lol.....the weird thing is the dispersal of the genes geographically....where I live (bruce / grey)...there are no timber wolves or eastern wolves anywhere near us....yet the coyotes here are the large phenotype that are labelled coywolves....and it's not a new phenomenon....you'd think that the "wolf" content would get diluted by the purer coyotes mating with the odd dispersed coy/wolf cross that wandered down....
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


cairnstone

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I see these animals all over Brampton Axeman. They seem pretty common. My camera got this one last night (Feb. 14). The camera only took one picture all night. Seems like it just appeared like a ghost.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Bird Brain

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Great photo.  ^^  Always exciting seeing wildlife!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »
Jo-Anne  \":)\"

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Axeman

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Ahhh....I think you'd catch pix of them regularly at this site....I think the composter brings them in...notice the Valentines pic was snapped at 8:30 pm...

Anyone ever see them in downtown brampton ? (I once saw a pair crossing Bloor St. in Bloor West village)

It amazes me at the wildlife you city dwellers get to see....I've never seen a coyote up here...and only once have I seen a pileated woodpecker....have NEVER seen a snowy owl...the only great horned owls I've seen were in Mississauga (Bernice Inman's place)...I was going to brag that we have seen bears up here but then Milton has had bears too lol
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


cairnstone

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I am not sure that they are directly attracted to the composter Axeman. Maybe they are attracted to the smaller critters that come by to sniff the composter. I'm sure they are smart enough to know that the composter contains nothing suitable to their diet. Morning-after rabbit fur is sometimes found. I think they are likely attracted to this area because it's the path of least resistance into and out of a woodlot strewn with obstacles. As my camera has revealed, they don't linger but quickly pass by (sometimes they pause for a quick howl). It is a busy path some nights with rabbits, cats, possums, skunks, raccoons, minks, groundhogs (daylight) and smaller rodents all using the same route.

I have a workmate that lives in downtown Brampton and he sees them from time to time in the evenings from his balcony. I live only a couple of kilometers from downtown Brampton. One day last winter I followed their tracks from home. They headed towards downtown Brampton following a creek, slipping past busy roads under bridges and presumably heading for nearby train tracks that pass through downtown. It seems their nightly wanderings take them quite a distance.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Reuven_M

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Coyotes might definitely be interested in a composter if there's food available - they are quite willing to eat fallen fruit, berries, carrion etc. I've seen wolves in Algonqui Park eating blueberries.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Axeman

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« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


cairnstone

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Thanks for the replies and thanks Axeman for that link on Western Coyotes. The composter in the last picture I posted is my neighbours. I also have one in my backyard. I'll post more photos of them when I set the camera out. Time is running out now as they generally only come around in winter.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


cairnstone

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I put the camera out last night and set it to record video. It was a busy night for creatures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xD7-PaJRfBQ
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »