Perseid meteor shower?
Outdoor Ontario

Perseid meteor shower?

Shortsighted

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Anyone watch or photograph the Perseid meteor shower?



Shortsighted

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 One of the most basic principles of photography, along with utilizing perspective, is to be cognizant of the depth of your composition, so that it has a clearly distinguishable foreground, mid-ground and background. Your photo capturing a single meteor impeccably satisfies that concept. The lake and the horizon, while far away, play the role of foreground, while the meteor high up in the atmosphere identifies the mid-ground. The center of our galaxy is the background of all backgrounds. What lens speed were you using for your photo? Nice use of image stacking software. I may try that someday when I have time to myself again. I wish I had something like DSS back in the days of film and when I had access to a telescope.


 




Charline

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Mr. Shortsighted, thank you for your thoughtful comments.

The lens for the above photo was a Sigma 16mm, at 15 sec. It was a single frame.

I was going to post another Perseid's image from last night. Due to lack of sleep, will try to do it later.


https://charline.pixels.com/featured/stargazing-with-perseid-meteor-shower-charline-xia.html

Did anyone else have fun with the Perseids?
« Last Edit: August 15, 2021, 04:40:46 pm by Charline »



Charline

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Thanks, Dinu.


This is what I photographed last night. Sigma 8-16mm, f5, at 20 sec.


https://charline.pixels.com/featured/astronomy-with-meteor-shower-charline-xia.html
« Last Edit: August 15, 2021, 10:08:11 pm by Charline »


Shortsighted

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Is that a small observatory on the left side of the picture?


Charline

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Shortsighted

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The Perseid meteor shower has a center of origin in that constellation and therefore meteors appear to emanate from the region between Perseus and Cassiopeia in the area of the double open cluster as depicted in this Tri-X Pan B&W film time-exposure on a small telescope taken a long time ago in university.

 


 


Charline

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Cool, so you were into deep sky objects.

Nowadays, my friends are using tracking devices and then stacking, the results are amazing. I am not able to handle heavy equipment so I can only envy.



Shortsighted

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Tracking was the only means to take a shot like this back in the day. No digital anything ... just fast film. The problem with a clock drive on a small to medium sized telescope is that it is not all that accurate. The mechanism wobbles a bit and does not maintain a consistent rate. Eventually drives were corrected by variable speed motors and computers that analyzed the errors in the tracking system and then delivered a message to the motor to speed-up or slow-down to correct the gear-based errors. Now we have stacking software that makes photography easier but tracking remains a problem. The telescope used for the photo eventually broke down vis-a-vis tracking. Tracking by hand with a guide scope with cross-hairs was the only solution but it sucked.

So, you can't handle heavy things. Well I can't handle heavy thoughts. I'm just so lazy and tired with care-giving stuff that I haven't even managed to play with the version of DSS that I have. I was even too lazy to apply it to Neowise (10 frames) because I never got around to acquiring the 10 flat frames, 10 bias frames and 10 dark frames. I remember that it was 18 degrees out at the time I took the light frames so I could always obtain the ancillary data frames at another time but I'm just too dam lazy. Please, don't you get lazy ... it's a terrible affliction. Sometimes I ask myself what Dinu would do in a particular situation and then I just get so depressed because I don't have his drive. He drives everywhere!

 
« Last Edit: August 21, 2021, 03:24:15 pm by Shortsighted »


Charline

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I tried to stack Neowise in DSS, but no matter what, I cannot get the blue gas tail.

I am not lazy, just sick sometimes lol.


Shortsighted

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Dinu has a f2.8 aperture  to my f4 and he used twice the exposure interval so that he managed 4 x the light. I figured that even applying DSS would not deliver a better result, so why bother. Just ask Dinu why he gets the blues. I get the blues all the time but it doesn't help. Since he is a physicist he has a licence to confuse you. Clearly, you have both located your camera to a dark sky location farther up north than I have the means to access. No time. Can't be away for more than 30 minutes. Vee must get to see bottom of zis problem, no?


Axeman

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I watch it every year -- there is an astronomy convention every year at that time hosted in the campsite behind my place so I'm always reminded. The first 10 years or so that we lived here, I'd go out and look and never see a thing......I was looking the wrong way....turns out the best place to spot them is on my deck....and if I go out at the right time, there are hundreds if not thousands of them...this year I was up at my cottage...the convention hasn't operated for the last 2 years....obvious reasons....anyway, I did get lucky up north and spotted a couple....the convention is called Starfest.


Shortsighted

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Starfest sounds intimidating. Being surrounded by all those telescopes and astronomical gear is like going to an audio show and being overwhelmed by high-end equipment that costs more than your car, or attending a car show that features vehicles worth more than everything one is likely to own in an entire lifetime. Getting into any hobby now is frustrating; either because some aspect of it (in the modern world) is now considered illegal, or because it requires a costly license. The tools of the hobby are likely beyond one's means. Someone recently asked me about a model that I used in a photo and told me that a model "kit" now costs $50.00 to $150.00. How is a kid, or a teenager ever going to afford to purchase a Styrene-based injection molded kit. The kit used in the photo was made years ago and probably cost $8.00. When amateur telescopes were made in the USA, or the UK they cost a few hundred dollars, perhaps a grand for a larger aperture. Now the equipment is probably made in China and costs thousands of dollars. Unless one is wealthy, or one's parents are wealthy, there is almost no chance of getting into a hobby any more. Even sports equipment now can set you back thousands. I think that Starfest would make me very uncomfortable. If its just behind your house do they ever ask you to turn off your exterior lights?