Plane Photography
Outdoor Ontario

Plane Photography

Paul O'Toole

  • Old Timer
  • *****
    • Posts: 765
Here is an interesting story published back home in my province of Newfoundland that may be of interest to plane photographers.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/plane-spotting-gander-1.5359055
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

  • Old Timer
  • *****
    • Posts: 1670
When I read plain photography I figured it was a topic just up my alley and then I
noticed the spelling and my hopes were dashed. I have plenty of plain photography,
some might say bland but that is overstating it. Anyway, I'm surprised that Gander
isn't a bigger draw considering its relative importance in the history of Canadian
Aviation. The chintzy little peep hole for photography of visiting aircraft is dis-
appointing. Why not offer bleachers with beer? Thank goodness we have Gander. Thank
goodness we have Newfoundland within the confederation, especially when both
Quebec and Alberta wish to separate. Since most of our present culture, writers,
musicians and actors trace their roots to the "Rock" we would be impoverished with-
out NFL. At the risk of introducing a non-sequitur, since I've never been to Gander
to see the planes, I must create my own plane photography.


(Two Fairey Fulmars patroling the coast of Sardinia (actually a 1/72 scale model and the east end of the beaches)


(Several views if a 1/72 scale model of a Fairey Swordfish and a 1/144th scale model of a destroyer integrated with a view of L. Ontario taken from the bluffs).


(A 1/72 scale model of a Typhoon integrated with an interesting cloudy sky shot through the window of the LRT).
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

  • Old Timer
  • *****
    • Posts: 1670
A couple of additional examples of plane photography for someone who simply can’t go to where planes might be stationed, or preferably flown at an air show. Once again, fantasy plane photography involves integrating a scale model aircraft (1/72 scale) with an actual location. I have several more planes that could be utilized in the same way ( Henshel 126, Me 110, Me 109, Hawker Hurricane, Fairy Skua ) but I can’t seem to motivate myself to pursue the task, nor can I think of a potential scheme for the credible integration of each example.


Westlake Lysander (1/72nd scale) integrated with a very short landing field behind enemy lines. {Actually the Rouge Valley)


Junkers 87 (1/72 scale) - Stuka dive bomber ... integrated with ordinance parked out front of the Toronto armory. The pilot of this Stuka is in big trouble.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Napper

  • Old Timer
  • *****
    • Posts: 1367
Interesting subject,

you must know that this site exists.
I did a quick search of my favourite a/c

https://www.airliners.net/photo/Untitle ... zrugEBlC4p

I have to get around to changing my avatar to reflect my interest in aviation..

Napper
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »
flkr...http://www.flickr.com/photos/36614671@N06/   Recent updates 2017 old pics
You know your getting old when.....wait, what?


Shortsighted

  • Old Timer
  • *****
    • Posts: 1670
Actually, I didn’t know about the recommended website. I’m not all that aware of websites in general because I don’t spend that much time web surfing. Nonetheless, thanks for the suggestion. I can’t find that much on the theme of integrating scale models with reality scenes despite the technique having been done even before digital photography. Although the concept is meant to reflect reality, the placement of WW II aircraft into a contemporary scene should be carried through all the way, including the application of artifacts and the compression of dynamic range to mimic photographs of the time. PS has tools for this but they are very hard to master. Sometimes I just get the urge to integrate an old plane with something totally off the wall, well within the precinct of fantasy. For instance, while I was photographing an old bridge superstructure I took a shot of part of the steelwork with the idea in mind to add a WW II plane as science fiction. I processed a circular feature of the steel bridge into a time-gate, in the manner of TV show Stargate. As if the hole was a portal to another time. Ya, I know, it’s nuts



At other times getting a plane into a shot is easier, such as when the Hamilton Aviation Museum does a fly-by over downtown Toronto as it did back in about 2010 and depicted in a shot I titled ANACHRONISM.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »