WINTER BIRDS ADVENT CALENDAR
Outdoor Ontario

WINTER BIRDS ADVENT CALENDAR


Shortsighted

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Thanks Bird Brain. Does that mean you think like a bird? I hope that it's not a connotation of anencephaly, dysfunction on the new tablet notwithstanding. Oh, I get it now ... 'birds' on the brain. I like it! Anyway, getting a subject to look anthropomorphic is simply a matter of relaxing behind the viewfinder and not fretting over exposure details. In that state of zen your mind's eye has no trouble identifying poses and "looks' that are captivating. In practice, I take multiple shots, or short bursts, often when the subject looks like it is just about to become interesting. The moment is often so fleeting that the delay between triggering the shutter button and the actual tripping of the shutter is enough to miss the desired outcome. Admittedly there are times when I can't relax because the chance to get a shot is measured in milliseconds, or when my limbs are so over-extended by precarious posture that I'm flirting with disaster. I'm lucky if the bird is then in the frame at all. This male non-brooding juvenile King Eider duck was not going anywhere because it didn't know that I was there. No, that's not right ... I didn't mean brooding, ... I meant breeding ... it's me that is a brooding juvenile. Now that I've settled that issue, I would like to add that my flexed neck was the main deterrent to achieving littoral zen on that occasion.
 


Shortsighted

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December 17 - (8 days until Christmas)Mountain Bluebird
« Last Edit: December 18, 2021, 08:36:34 pm by Shortsighted »


Shortsighted

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December 18 - ( 7 days until Christmas )Carolina Wren
« Last Edit: December 18, 2021, 08:37:14 pm by Shortsighted »


Charline

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Great collection! Would you please name each bird so a newbie like moi could learn something??


Shortsighted

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OK Charline ... I have labelled the photos, as per your request.


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December 19 - (6 days until Christmas)
(male) White-winged Scoter




Ally

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Where did you find the Mountain blue bird? I love all blue birds.


Shortsighted

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On a couple of occasions: at the Beare Hill wetland and on Hall's Rd. in Whitby. The Beare Hill bird may have been a hybrid and the Hall's Rd bird was a female. I have also seen Eastern Bluebirds at Beare Hill wetland on two other occasions. The first time I only had the Canon G9 and therefore couldn't get close enough. The second time I didn't have a camera with me. I've also seen EB in the hydro field leading up to the Beare Hill wetland coming from the east. I posted those shots before, taken with the 70 - 200mm. I've also seen EB at Amos pond area at least once. A couple fleetingly appeared once at Ashbridges Bay spit.


alex

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Loving this series! Maybe it’s because I’m an outsider (from australia) but I find bluebirds to be one of ontario’s most beautiful and underrated birds. Not a lot a talk about them among birders it seems…


Ally

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Loving this series! Maybe it’s because I’m an outsider (from australia) but I find bluebirds to be one of ontario’s most beautiful and underrated birds. Not a lot a talk about them among birders it seems…
Preciously because I can't find them.


Ally

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On a couple of occasions: at the Beare Hill wetland and on Hall's Rd. in Whitby. The Beare Hill bird may have been a hybrid and the Hall's Rd bird was a female. I have also seen Eastern Bluebirds at Beare Hill wetland on two other occasions. The first time I only had the Canon G9 and therefore couldn't get close enough. The second time I didn't have a camera with me. I've also seen EB in the hydro field leading up to the Beare Hill wetland coming from the east. I posted those shots before, taken with the 70 - 200mm. I've also seen EB at Amos pond area at least once. A couple fleetingly appeared once at Ashbridges Bay spit.


After I find a short eared owl, I will go search for a Mountain Blue.


Shortsighted

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The Eastern Bluebird arrives very early in the spring when some snow may still be on the ground and certainly by the time the snow has vanished but everything is painted in earth tones. Bluebirds prefer open areas and forage in small loose flocks that seldom settle in one place. They prefer to be on the move. On every occasion when I've seen them, excluding the sighting at Ashbridges, they adopted a foraging corridor. In the hydro field the corridor was along the gravel foot path because that is where the small trees and bushes were located. Again, at the Beare wetland they moved back and forth along the path between the paved access road and the dirt trail that led off into the wooded area, never far from the ponds. At Amos they were near the water but high in the barren trees. At Hall's Rd the female Mountain Bluebird, which was a rare displaced visitor, systematically foraged on the paved pathway, looking for insects, traveling from fence post to fence post to rest on a regular basis. I counted the number of posts it would pass before perching and found the number to be fairly consistent and therefore allowed me to predict where the next perch might be and positioned myself accordingly. The bird mostly ignored my staged proximity as long as I didn't move and buried my face behind the camera. Sometimes I was fixed on the anticipated perch even before the bird arrived, then applying my peripheral vision for surveillance of the approaching treasure. The same technique was taken perhaps to the extreme in the nearby hydro field. Again I observed the birds foraging back and forth along the gravel path with an amplitude of about half a kilometer. I noted that one tree in particular served as a resting perch as part of every excursion. This was important. Their perching height was not conducive to getting a good shot, nor were all the tangle of branches and twigs. Nonetheless, I went home a got a step ladder and my camo cloth and returned to the tree. I could see the bluebirds far down the path. I set up the step-ladder at the edge of the path and climbed to the top and sat down and then threw my camo cloth over me and waited. Sure enough the birds arrived and settled in the tree. I didn't even have time to decide on a good exposure setting before the flock perched and the branch/twig issue remained a thorn. Get it, ... branch ... twig ... thorn. Ah never mind, but I did get closer as demanded by my 200mm lens.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2021, 08:00:46 am by Shortsighted »


Shortsighted

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December 20 - (five days until Christmas)


Lark Sparrow


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December 21 - (four days until Christmas)Horned Lark