Humber Bay Park East Jan 7
Outdoor Ontario

Humber Bay Park East Jan 7

Ally · 14 · 359

Ally

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Lighting was bad the whole morning, then turned out to be a nice day. Weather-wise


Ally

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A muted swan was killed, I found out later when I looked at the pics, by a wire, and its mate refused to leave


Ally

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A Coyote turned out from nowhere, I guess it was after a dog, who was lost briefly.
There was a hermit thrush, and by the time we were leaving, the ducks came closer to the bay. I think there are Ruddy ducks


Ally

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Hard not to get emotional when you see sad story like that, and the duck with left foot broken.


Shortsighted

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 I love your itinerant schedule: Downsview park – TTP – Humber Bay. What’s next? No, no, don’t tell me, I’m keen to guess. Certainly lots of ducks at Humber, as there should be. You mentioned Ruddy ducks but I can’t see any in your photos. I’ve seen them at Humber in March, when they were very sluggish. Believe me, I know from sluggish because I’ve have had so much practice at it. Ruddy ducks are worth the effort to photograph because their presence is not assured. I have always found them to be elusive subjects, as are Ring-necked ducks. Perhaps it’s just my lack of insight into their preferred hangouts.
The Ruddy ducks at Humber are usually congregated far from shore in a loose raft and that situation is entirely beyond the reach of my 200mm lens. The only time I spotted a group of Ruddy ducks somewhat closer to land was in the north-facing easternmost bay on the Humber Park spit. I had to walk the narrow strip of land between adjacent bays to reach a decent vantage point, identified by the presence of a dilapidated wooded platform several feet above the water level. Even here the ducks were too far away for a 200mm lens but it would have been a terrific opportunity for a 500mm – 600mm lens. The water was calm at the time, which was another bonus.
When light levels are very high, as it was on that occasion, it would be possible to use a TC even on a slow lens like yours. It would require manual focus and a small tripod, or bean bag to rest your camera on (the old wooden platform allowing this approach) because the effective f-stop with a TC coupled to your lens would be too dark to allow autofocus. The ducks are not moving so the subject is essentially a still-life. If I had a Teleconverter at the time I would surely have deployed it as a remedy for my shortsightedness. So, if you think you can shoot Ruddy ducks … go for it!
I can wait.
But not too long.


Dr. John

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Great pictures.


I think I saw the exact same duck when we were there a couple of weeks ago.  So it seems to be surviving OK despite the injury.


Ally

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I love your itinerant schedule: Downsview park – TTP – Humber Bay. What’s next? No, no, don’t tell me, I’m keen to guess. Certainly lots of ducks at Humber, as there should be. You mentioned Ruddy ducks but I can’t see any in your photos. I’ve seen them at Humber in March, when they were very sluggish. Believe me, I know from sluggish because I’ve have had so much practice at it. Ruddy ducks are worth the effort to photograph because their presence is not assured. I have always found them to be elusive subjects, as are Ring-necked ducks. Perhaps it’s just my lack of insight into their preferred hangouts.
The Ruddy ducks at Humber are usually congregated far from shore in a loose raft and that situation is entirely beyond the reach of my 200mm lens. The only time I spotted a group of Ruddy ducks somewhat closer to land was in the north-facing easternmost bay on the Humber Park spit. I had to walk the narrow strip of land between adjacent bays to reach a decent vantage point, identified by the presence of a dilapidated wooded platform several feet above the water level. Even here the ducks were too far away for a 200mm lens but it would have been a terrific opportunity for a 500mm – 600mm lens. The water was calm at the time, which was another bonus.
When light levels are very high, as it was on that occasion, it would be possible to use a TC even on a slow lens like yours. It would require manual focus and a small tripod, or bean bag to rest your camera on (the old wooden platform allowing this approach) because the effective f-stop with a TC coupled to your lens would be too dark to allow autofocus. The ducks are not moving so the subject is essentially a still-life. If I had a Teleconverter at the time I would surely have deployed it as a remedy for my shortsightedness. So, if you think you can shoot Ruddy ducks … go for it!
I can wait.
But not too long.
Need to go to work later today,so didn't go anywhere despite the terrific weather. Those ducks landing to the water, are they not Ruddy ducks? The ones with blue beaks.


Ally

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Great pictures.


I think I saw the exact same duck when we were there a couple of weeks ago.  So it seems to be surviving OK despite the injury.
Yes, she is a fighter! She certainly gets picked on.


Shortsighted

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 The ducks that I see on your photos are Greater Scaup (male and female) and Red-headed ducks.
Ruddy ducks (males) only have a blue-coloured bill during breeding season. Few of the ones that I saw had blue bills and although I have a picture I simply don’t know where it is right now. I have found these shots taken at the location described.







Shortsighted

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This is one of the shots I used in my thread "Birds in Perspective" some time ago andit shows a rather large group of Ruddy ducks at Humber Bay East. Notice that theseducks a small and compact in morphology while your Scaup ducks are larger and havemore pronounced neck extension. They also have different series numbers but capturing
that feature is a job for the Photosaurus Rex. I think he is working in ultraviolet now.I'm eager to see his eventual and inevitable interpretation of the fourth dimension.


Ally

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This is one of the shots I used in my thread "Birds in Perspective" some time ago andit shows a rather large group of Ruddy ducks at Humber Bay East. Notice that theseducks a small and compact in morphology while your Scaup ducks are larger and havemore pronounced neck extension. They also have different series numbers but capturing
that feature is a job for the Photosaurus Rex. I think he is working in ultraviolet now.I'm eager to see his eventual and inevitable interpretation of the fourth dimension.
I really do love see your pics in those threads, IDs, youngsters and so on. But somehow I can't see them after a while.


Shortsighted

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Photo didn't attach the first time:


Dinusaur

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Great set Ally. That picture of the dead swan broke my heart, despite it being an invasive species. I wished people are careful about disposing their fishing lines.