Colonel Samuel Smith Park Dec 3
Outdoor Ontario

Colonel Samuel Smith Park Dec 3

Ally · 17 · 669

Ally

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Went there late morning, it was bright


Ally

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Redpolls make me happy.


Ally

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Some even do stunts or Peekaboo


Ally

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They just cheer you up


Ally

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I have never met a Canvasback before, thanks to the birder in the park, now I have. I saw the hawk by the time I was leaving, rough legged?


Shortsighted

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 Congratulations, some very good shots. Redpolls make me happy too. None around here and so I’m miserable. I’ve only seen a Canvasback once. That was on Toronto Island before I had a DSLR and way out of my range. Your shots are quite close, especially the portrait with the head turned to catch just the right amount of light. A 600mm lens is a wonderful thing.
I heard a reciprocating noise yesterday that caught my attention because it sort of mimicked a siren but was definitely not a siren. Eventually I opened the door a discovered that it was caused by an assemblage of distant bird … seemingly like hundreds of them. I couldn’t see where they were situated and didn’t have the time to properly investigate the source of the sound. I realized later that it may have been a flock of irruption birds. I should have thought of that sooner. Thinking is not my forte.
Looks like you had a great day at Sam Smith.


Ally

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Congratulations, some very good shots. Redpolls make me happy too. None around here and so I’m miserable. I’ve only seen a Canvasback once. That was on Toronto Island before I had a DSLR and way out of my range. Your shots are quite close, especially the portrait with the head turned to catch just the right amount of light. A 600mm lens is a wonderful thing.
I heard a reciprocating noise yesterday that caught my attention because it sort of mimicked a siren but was definitely not a siren. Eventually I opened the door a discovered that it was caused by an assemblage of distant bird … seemingly like hundreds of them. I couldn’t see where they were situated and didn’t have the time to properly investigate the source of the sound. I realized later that it may have been a flock of irruption birds. I should have thought of that sooner. Thinking is not my forte.
Looks like you had a great day at Sam Smith.
Yes, I did. And the weather started to change by the time I was leaving. hoped to find the mocking birds, no luck. Could you ID the hawk for me please? Thanks


Dinusaur

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That Rough-legged Hawk is icing on the cake - great stuff Ally.


Ally

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That Rough-legged Hawk is icing on the cake - great stuff Ally.


Thanks Dinu, I heard there was an Eider there too, but I didn't spend a lot of time looking.  One birder said he looked for a while.


Shortsighted

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 I assume that the Eider sighting was of a juvenile King, not a Common. A single juv. King seems to prefer kipping-out at Sam Smith many years. It’s like it has a standing reservation. Where was the Canvasback?
Was it on the eastern shore of the marina bay? There is usually a Mockingbird at Humber Bay East located in the stretch of hedges that parallels the gravel path that leads to the small bridge/culvert spanning the mouth of the lagoon. The hedge is on your left side as you walk toward the bridge from the street, sort of the park entrance. For some reason a MB is so often hidden within the hedge. Sometimes it sticks its head out to call “scram” and then it disappears back into the hedge.
The first shot was taken at CSS and the other two near the Humber Bay hedge. Both of the last shots were taken with a point-and-shoot as I was learning how to use it. The first one was taken with my T4i just after I got it using the kit lens 18mm - 135mm.












Ally

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Those are wonderful shots!! Canvasback was taken in the water right pass the bridge, where there are many docks.


Shortsighted

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Was there also a female Canvasback present?Was it alone or in the company of other duck species?So, I imagine that you were shooting toward the east after having gotten down to the rocks.


Ally

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Was there also a female Canvasback present?Was it alone or in the company of other duck species?So, I imagine that you were shooting toward the east after having gotten down to the rocks.
I don't know. I didn't see another one, but I heard there was another one.




Ally

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I assume that the Eider sighting was of a juvenile King, not a Common. A single juv. King seems to prefer kipping-out at Sam Smith many years. It’s like it has a standing reservation. Where was the Canvasback?
Was it on the eastern shore of the marina bay? There is usually a Mockingbird at Humber Bay East located in the stretch of hedges that parallels the gravel path that leads to the small bridge/culvert spanning the mouth of the lagoon. The hedge is on your left side as you walk toward the bridge from the street, sort of the park entrance. For some reason a MB is so often hidden within the hedge. Sometimes it sticks its head out to call “scram” and then it disappears back into the hedge.
The first shot was taken at CSS and the other two near the Humber Bay hedge. Both of the last shots were taken with a point-and-shoot as I was learning how to use it. The first one was taken with my T4i just after I got it using the kit lens 18mm - 135mm.
Just occur to me, how long will that King Eider remain juvi? :-* :D :D









Shortsighted

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First winter.An adult in eclipse plumage (summer) will look similar to a juvenile.One was also spotted in the east from Thickson Rd area in Whitbydown on the lake from the private residential road ... not the bestplace to photograph one.