Migratory warblers ... anyone?
Outdoor Ontario

Migratory warblers ... anyone?

Shortsighted

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I've fleetingly spotted a few small birds in the woodlot across the street
that behaved as warblers but most often by the time I get my camera
and walk over to the edge of the woodlot there is nothing left to be seen.
Standing motionless for 10 minutes eventually reveals movement once again.
I try the same technique at different spots along the road in order to get different trees.
There are a lot of dead trees. I wonder what they are?
Love this brisker weather and the dramatic clouds.
Magnolia warbler, B&W warbler, Gnatcatcher, Cape May, Chestnut-sided,
Myrtle and a pale yellow/gray species that eludes me. Very faint gray streaks
on flank. Maybe another Cape May. Can't remember what the crown looked like.







« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Steve Hood

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That is a nice selection for a fall migration.  I tried my luck on the weekend but I could barely see any warblers except for the resident Redstarts.  Your last bird image looks like a Red-eyed Vireo.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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Thanks Steve. They were taken in two locations now that I recall, both
on the street woodlot and a nearby gravel road paralleling the hydro
field. I realize that the last bird is a REV. It says so on the label. And
I'm proud to say that it is also ... Made in Canada. The day before and the
day after there was no movement in the woodlot at all. It must have
been a group swept-in overnight by the cold front from the northwest.
I did see a kestrel flying around the neighbourhood a few days ago chasing
everything in sight. Impressive speed! Made me think of a P. falcon except
that it was too small for a falcon and I got a glimpse of it in binoculars while
it was perched way up on one of those dead trees that I previously mentioned.
I would have liked to pursue the task longer but I was constantly preoccupied
by my parent that needs constant attention. In other words, my brain was still
at home ... or at least half of it. That's me, half man - half wit.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Dinusaur

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Fantastic set SS. I was out in Downsview Park last week after the overnight North wind; unfortunately didn't see much except for a beautiful Baird's Sandpiper. Hopefully soon.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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So, where's the beautiful Baird's sandpiper?
No photograph?
Do you think a Baird's SP is below our threshold for appreciation?
Your shorebird photos are so crisp and replete with exquisite pixel
detail, as if cropping was something only we lesser mortals must
resort to, and of course your right in that sentiment, this beautiful
bird must be presented. Forum decorum demands it! I sound desperate
don't I? I'll admit it. It's not like I'm going to catch a sandpiper, of any
persuasion, strut across the living room floor, any time soon.
Wow, what if?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »