Dec 27
Outdoor Ontario

Dec 27

Ally · 15 · 1061

Ally

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I know, I know, I am crazy.
When I was entering the park, something flew away. Got a terrible shot of it. Please tell me it's a shortie. Or not.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2021, 04:34:39 pm by Ally »


Shortsighted

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The body is too dark for a short-eared and the wings don't display the two dark areas (wing tips and 2/3 rd along the wing at the leading edge viewed from underneath) are both missing.
Love the close kestrel encounter.


Shortsighted

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By Jove Watson, I do believe that you've finally captured a fine shot of a Short-eared owl on the wing. In this case I dare say that the game was not a' foot. Take note of the black markings under the wing that I previously mentioned that serve as certain identification.

It is elementary, my dear Watson, that with persistence and perseverance (and even occasional perspiration) you will get your bird. Well done indeed! I must now return to the oven and get out my bird on the spit.   

This park seems to be right up your Ally. First the Humber trail and now Downsview ... staking out your territory, eh Watson.


Dinusaur

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Congrats Ally - you have seen them all. I wasn't so lucky with the SWO the day John and I went there. Ah well, as SS summed it up - it's all about perseverance.


Dinusaur

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Third time is a charm. Not only got the shortie, I finally got the shrike too. This young bird was so chatty! I wondered whether he was raised by the mocking bird.
Haha, the Shrike is chatty indeed. It is after all a Songbird, it was serenading you Ally.


By the way I dropped by the park this morning and saw a Short-eared for a brief period of time. Interestingly the park authority has put up a fence around the evergreens where the Long-eared Owls usually roost. However, the determined people sought out the owls in different parts of the park and as usual mobbing them for a better photo opportunity. I hoped that seeing the fence people would come to their senses and think twice before getting too close to roosting owls.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2021, 05:21:35 pm by Dinusaur »


Ally

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Third time is a charm. Not only got the shortie, I finally got the shrike too. This young bird was so chatty! I wondered whether he was raised by the mocking bird.
Haha, the Shrike is chatty indeed. It is after all a Songbird, it was serenading you Ally.


By the way I dropped by Downsview this morning and saw a Shor-eared for a brief period of time. Interestingly the park authority has put up a fence around the evergreens where the Long-eared Owls usually roost. However, the determined people sought out the owls in different parts of the park and as usual mobbing them for a better photo opportunity. I hoped that seeing the fence people would come to their senses and think twice before getting too close to roosting owls.


Yes, they put the fence yesterday morning. Mirek was so upset when he discovered people got too close to the SWO and drove it away. He found the footprints.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2021, 04:40:57 pm by Ally »


lovemypt

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By advertising the location along with pictures, you are only adding to the hysteria surrounding these owls. This is not a close/private chat rooms and many of these photographers who are hounding the birds, search out posts like this in order to find their next victims,  as they process little knowledge or desire to learn,  easier just to chase other people's reports.  Owls such as short_ears are now on the endangered list and should not be openly posted


Ally

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By advertising the location along with pictures, you are only adding to the hysteria surrounding these owls. This is not a close/private chat rooms and many of these photographers who are hounding the birds, search out posts like this in order to find their next victims,  as they process little knowledge or desire to learn,  easier just to chase other people's reports.  Owls such as short_ears are now on the endangered list and should not be openly posted
okay, I will take the post down.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2021, 04:41:16 pm by Ally »


lovemypt

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Don't have to remove your pictures.....you just shouldn't name the location in an opem forum


Ally

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Don't have to remove your pictures.....you just shouldn't name the location in an opem forum


Okay. But my pictures are super cute, they will attract more fans. ;D ;D



Shortsighted

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 Behavioral adaptation by wildlife to the increasing intrusion of people is as widespread as mankind itself and represents just another variation on nature’s expansive program. Humans are a part of nature and no more invasive than many other species, even though in every case this malignant predisposition may prove counterproductive to the species so afflicted. There are certainly many examples of the situation whereby wildlife becomes acclimated to human presence, when the wilds are no longer completely wild, or when human development equates to an abundance of easily accessible food in the form of discards. Coyote, bear and rodents are especially troublesome in some locales. Less common examples include deer and moose in places like Newfoundland, or polar bears in the arctic. Birds can adjust their behavior to the presence of humans just as profoundly as mammals. Examples of familiarity and tolerance of people is definitely occurring in city parks, provincial parks and even with a housing complex. GTA birding hotspots are not only “hot” because of their proximity to flight routes, the lake, and because of long spits extending into the lake, all serving as funnels for bird migration, but also these locales remain destinations for birders because the birds have gotten accustomed to people in their midst. This adaptation influences their behavior to a variation of wild behavior and making their presence easier to detect and to photograph. This inevitable behavioral adaptation is not necessarily a bad thing. If birding was too difficult it would have very few advocates and support for wildlife would not be as passionate as its current expression. Wildlife in an urban setting, in contrast to essential wildlife, must get used to humans to survive and nature is making adjustments according to that manifesto. Swarming of the owls at Downsview Park is not a recommended protocol but leaving them completely alone may not be doing them any favours. Protecting owls from nuckleheads seems to me to be a worthy objective. It is not necessary to approach an owl close enough to obtain a pharyngeal swab. It is unacceptable to bait an owl. Using an unchoked electronic flash is the resource of a twit. Alas, it may be necessary to put up some signs to deter the mentally challenged, by shaming if necessary, to make it so socially unacceptable to act like an idiot in front of all of Bravo company that the owls may suffer much less stress and yet their celebrity status remains a pillar of the public’s appreciation and support of wildlife.             


alex

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Harassment is one thing, but I would guess the constant attention given to those owls in particular has probably shielded them from predation to some extent.


It’s unusual to see wild owls in the same place weeks apart, let alone month after month. If they weren’t benefiting from human intervention in some way, they’d be long gone.


Dinusaur

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Interesting discussion about bird photography and harassments, this is a hot topic these days in many birding forums - over enthusiastic bird photographers vs. over jealous naturalists.


I agree with SS' assessment of raising awareness through photography. It's unfortunate that we sometimes bicker about something non-trivial when the bigger issues remain unnoticed. Let's face it, since 1970, 3 billion birds disappeared in North America - photography or over enthusiastic photographer was not one of the causes. I remember seeing this photo in a science museum in Durham, North Carolina; science needs shutterbugs.



alex

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Couldn’t agree more. A handful of owls in an urban recreation park will make little difference if the greater habitat is not conserved and the root causes addressed.


I’m glad something is being done to shelter and protect sensitive species, but I really don’t think more fences and barriers is the answer.


Many of these parks were explicitly designed for humans as a respite from urban development. We don’t need more signs, more fences and more rules. What we need is more unpatrolled greenspace for the wider public to connect with nature without fear of judgement or retribution from narrow-focus interest groups.


Dr. John

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Went to the park on Friday and the LEOs were there, one was essentially right by the fence and easily seen.  It didn't seem at all concerned, taking some time to preen before settling back into a prolonged nap.  Did see a bunch of other people with ginormous lenses, but no one behaving badly as far as I could tell.