Backyard warbler
Outdoor Ontario

Backyard warbler

Shortsighted

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A Mourning warbler was hanging around the backyard this afternoon. I tried to get a photo but every time I stepped outside it disappeared and I could not stake-out the yard due to my care-giving duties, although I tried several times for 5 - 10 minute spells. I did have opportunity to see it while still outside but it was always behind weeds. My one chance was when it perched on the edge of a border board for about three seconds without there being any significant intervening obstructions that might ruin the frame. Unfortunately I could not react fast enough to get a shot. I'll be shocked if it is still around tomorrow.


Shortsighted

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Mourning warbler still present in backyard ... second day now. It just loves my tall weeds.






Ally

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Shortsighted

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Why Ally, he's in mourning, n'est pas?



Shortsighted

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A couple more photos of a Mourning warbler in backyard enjoying the unkempt garden full of tall weeds:





« Last Edit: September 07, 2021, 08:35:14 am by Shortsighted »


Ally

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You will have to name him now. All the birds and deer stay for more than three days have my last name. My feathered and furred siblings.


Shortsighted

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I assumed that the Mourning warbler in the backyard was a single bird, now having moved on. However, one of my photos shows a warbler without the characteristic black beast herald for the portion of the breast actually visible in the shot. The black marking may be just beyond the breast horizon and therefore not visible for reasons of geometry, or perhaps there was more than one bird. Could there have been two Mourning warblers in the yard ... a male and a female? What are the odds?

Naming a bird comes with baggage, even though the urge to anthropomorphize is intense. If I choose a name I may forget it. Upon future encounter ... awkward!


Dinusaur

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Wow, what a great visitor to have in the backyard, Great photos and it does seem like two different birds.


thouc

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Nice you got him (or them) back, great photos, Mourning Warblers are difficult to take pictures of.


/Thomas


Shortsighted

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Looked out into the backyard this morning at about 8:30 and there was a Mourning warbler once again after absence for a day. At one point it was sitting in tall weeds with only its head sticking out ... motionless ... except for turning of the head from side to side. This squat lasted about two full minutes! This warbler was definitely a male with a strongly gray head and dark lore/mask. While watching it with binoculars it suddenly took off with alacrity and zoomed out of my field of view. Reason: a raccoon and three kits appeared on the beam of the fence and then climbed down into the neighbour's yard. Have not seen the warbler since. The sun is too bright on my dirty window to stare for twitching weeds for more than a few seconds. I could put sunglasses on but that might look too pretentious.

 


Ally

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Do put them on, then the racoons might think you are one of them.


Shortsighted

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By the time the sun was at its most intense the raccoons were long gone therefore they would never see me in shades. If I see a warbler tomorrow morning I will be in shock. A juvenile Scarlet tanager flew against the window but survived this blunt force trauma.