The Nature of Things: Accidental Wilderness
Outdoor Ontario

The Nature of Things: Accidental Wilderness

Walter Fisher

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Show:  The Nature of Things with David Suzuki
Episode:  Accidental Wilderness
Topic:  Tommy Thompson Park, The Leslie Street Spit, The Spit

Date:  Friday February 14th
Time:  9:00pm
Channel:  CBC

Trailer:  https://www.cbc.ca/natureofthings/episo ... treet-spit

Good birding,
Walter :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »
Is backyard birding our new normal?


Dinusaur

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Thanks for the info - I'll definitely be watching.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Paul O'Toole

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I will watch that for sure, never been their but will be very interesting to watch for sure.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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Thanks for the prompt.
Will not miss it.
I'll bring the popcorn.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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The one hour CBC program on the ‘Nature of Things’ concerning the history of, and the present state of Tommy Thompson Park, aka ‘The Spit’, was over all too quickly, although I was glad I didn’t need to endure any more of those commercial interruptions that seem to go on-and-on. By the time the actual documentary resumed I had almost forgotten why I tuned in to begin with.
The segment of the program reviewing the creation of the spit and the contentious plans for the landfill was certainly an appropriate introduction and created some nostalgia, for sure.



The aerial views of the spit always seem so removed from the impression I get from the ground. The trek to the tip of the spit seems to be a trivial travail when viewed from the air but that same journey translates differently when done on foot with the burden of a backpack and camera.
There was not enough video showing the different parts of the park. Too much attention was directed at the cormorant problem.




The cells were barely mentioned and the wet woods not at all. They started to mention the fauna but there it ended.



No mention of the rarities and accidental visitors. Unless I missed it there was no speculations offered for the possible future of the spit.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Dinusaur

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Yep, it was not bad overall. However, it also made me think going there on a snowy day - it looked magical. I also convinced my wife to watch the documentary about a place that I go often in the Spring - she had no idea what it looked like from above and how part of the lake was claimed. I wasn't aware of Branding turtles in the park - a great surprise.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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I also wasn't aware that the turtles were being branded.
How barbaric.
I suppose that Blanding turtles are just too bland without some form of tattoo
branded or otherwise.
I didn't know that Red-eared sliders were invasive from Texas.
They weren't going to let the stink of the cormorant nesting site get past
without emphasizing it with carbon respirators worn in most shots, although I
suspect that was more a matter of infection control. I had to laugh when
the two guys were yelling at the nesting cormorant. My experience is
that the birds will ignore you, or defecate on your head. It was nice to see
nesting heron and egret, although few in number compared to the DCC.

The cormorant are not the problem. The problem is that the spit provided an
ideal nesting site and the birds just did what they are programmed to do and
that is to take ruthless advantage of what man provided. A less ideal habitat
may have worked out better.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Dinusaur

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Haha, you got me there Shortsighted - Blanding, Branding what's in a name, a rose is a rose.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Axeman

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I caught it -- was a great episode. I have never been to TT Park but I've always been curious.

So if I wanted to go the next time I'm down in the GTA, where do I drive to and park at?

Re: cormorants...I first noticed them in the summer of 1993 in Port Credit. At first I thought I was seeing loons. And then realized they were cormorants but I was still very excited to see them -- they were a new bird. Unfortunately the chased the black crowned night herons away. I remember when that colony (BCNH)  arrived in the late 70's.

Anyway it was a great episode...if you can catch it, I recommend it...it gets both oculars up from me.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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TTP has a fenced parking lot (gravel and dirt) that closes early. You could always
park on Unwin Road, which extends westward from the park entrance. It remains your
only choice during weekdays. You are not encouraged to enter the park because of trucks.
In the spring ( May) you will likely visit the wet woods, which is no where near the trucking (main)
thoroughfare and therefore will not interfere with landfill activities. The cormorant
colony in April is about 75% of the way down the spit on the west side. You can hear it and
eventually smell it. BCNH and a few Great Egret also nest there.


« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Shortsighted

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Nesting at TTP per Nature of /Things theme:







« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Ally

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Wow, what is that with the blue eye patch?
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Shortsighted

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The blue eye patch?
What are you drinking?
I'll have some too.
Ah, you mean the torquoise patch, aka green patch for the less imaginative.
I've only seen that on a breeding Great Egret.
I believe it's a signal. One egret to another ... you know.
(Are you thinking what I'm thinking).
I doubt if egret actually engage in much thinking.
Nonetheless, semaphores can be useful.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »


Walter Fisher

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Hey folks, it's been a while since the show was first aired but looking back I have to say that they did focus too much time on the Cormorants and not enough time on the park itself, unfortunate really.  It's an icredible place to go and spend the day enjoying the flora and fauna.

Good birding,
Walter  :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 pm by Guest »
Is backyard birding our new normal?