Monarch, Siliver-spotted skipper, Red Admiral and Black Swallowtail
Outdoor Ontario

Monarch, Siliver-spotted skipper, Red Admiral and Black Swallowtail

Ally · 8 · 110

Ally

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Lots of the Monarches today. I would say about 20 in total on the Milkweed.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2021, 10:10:41 pm by Ally »


Ally

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The Red Admiral was really cooperative. Not like the Monarch.


Shortsighted

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Nice set of butterfly shots with some excellent exposures. Butterflies can be difficult in more ways than simply being gadabouts. The bright colours can be over exposed in an attempt to capture detail on dark anatomy, or when the colours are perfect then the dark parts are featureless. Your lens handles this dilemma well. I guess f6.3 gives you a good DOF. You have an admirable dedication to the pursuit and you clearly understand the principle of result through persistence.


Ally

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Nice set of butterfly shots with some excellent exposures. Butterflies can be difficult in more ways than simply being gadabouts. The bright colours can be over exposed in an attempt to capture detail on dark anatomy, or when the colours are perfect then the dark parts are featureless. Your lens handles this dilemma well. I guess f6.3 gives you a good DOF. You have an admirable dedication to the pursuit and you clearly understand the principle of result through persistence.


Thanks. Butterflies are harder. On windy days like today, it's fun to watch them held on to the plant. My neighbour had a flower patch that attracted lots of swallowtails last year. Hope they will come again.
By the way, I saw so many moths when I was in High Park on Monday. I did take some shots but they creeped me out when I tried to process them, so gave up. They were on tree trunks and also some dead pupas. Not for everyone.


Dr. John

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By the way, I saw so many moths when I was in High Park on Monday. I did take some shots but they creeped me out when I tried to process them, so gave up. They were on tree trunks and also some dead pupas. Not for everyone.


Were they gypsy moths?


Regarding monarchs, you should try raising them.  They are very cooperative after they emerge from the chrysalis (because they can't fly yet).  We just released our second Monarch this morning.


Ally

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By the way, I saw so many moths when I was in High Park on Monday. I did take some shots but they creeped me out when I tried to process them, so gave up. They were on tree trunks and also some dead pupas. Not for everyone.


Were they gypsy moths?


Regarding monarchs, you should try raising them.  They are very cooperative after they emerge from the chrysalis (because they can't fly yet).  We just released our second Monarch this morning.
Could be, I don't know Moths. Some are white like the gpysy moths pictures I searched. Most of them are brown colored though.

I don't have plants that will attract Monarchs myself. I did see two fly by my door yesterday, none stopped. Funny not a lot of butterflies like roses.


Dr. John

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Could be, I don't know Moths. Some are white like the gpysy moths pictures I searched. Most of them are brown colored though.

I don't have plants that will attract Monarchs myself. I did see two fly by my door yesterday, none stopped. Funny not a lot of butterflies like roses.


The white ones are females.  They usually don't fly and just sit on tree trunks waiting to mate and then lay eggs.  The brown ones are males and they fly around looking for females.


Common milkweed is very easy to grow.  Gather the seeds when the pods mature in the fall and just scatter them in whatever area you want.  They have lovely smelling flowers that attract lots of other native insects.  They also host milkweed beetles and milkweed bugs, which are also interesting.


Ally

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    • Posts: 1895
Could be, I don't know Moths. Some are white like the gpysy moths pictures I searched. Most of them are brown colored though.

I don't have plants that will attract Monarchs myself. I did see two fly by my door yesterday, none stopped. Funny not a lot of butterflies like roses.


The white ones are females.  They usually don't fly and just sit on tree trunks waiting to mate and then lay eggs.  The brown ones are males and they fly around looking for females.


Common milkweed is very easy to grow.  Gather the seeds when the pods mature in the fall and just scatter them in whatever area you want.  They have lovely smelling flowers that attract lots of other native insects.  They also host milkweed beetles and milkweed bugs, which are also interesting.


Thanks for the suggestions!!