2021 moth observations
Outdoor Ontario

2021 moth observations

cabz

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SS - I noticed your comment re the surplus electronic store outlet!!!  Active Surplus?  Which is not more!!  How about Boeing surplus in Seattle, which i thinks is closed now also.  My husband is an electronics geek, who worked in aerospace and also does it as a hobby.  Needless to say, that is one on the list when we travel, visiting electronic surplus stores, if available. 


Loved the moths pics!!!!!


Shortsighted

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I 'wasn't exactly thinking of Active when I wrote that observation about a moth resembling an electronic component because for a long time Active was more of an outlet for surplus anything, whether electronic or mechanical, and also because Active lost a great deal of its appeal when it imploded into a single-floor, second story hole in the wall. I was actually thinking of Sayal Electronics back when it was in Scarborough on Victoria Park. Now it's located in Mississauga. I envy your husband if he gets to explore exotic and remote outlets. Just yesterday I was looking for a super bright LED to install as a headlight into am HO-scale Athern SW1500 switcher engine because I'm giving some model railroad gear to a neighbours kids. I couldn't find a single useful LED. Moreover, they are all 30 years old and in no way compare to what is available today, except that today you need to order such items online, which I don't do.

I can't recall if I actually purchased LEDs at Sayal, or elsewhere, but I did rummage through the stacks looking for components for building an electronic crossover for an audio project and large coils and capacitors for passive crossover applied to audio speakers. I ended up having to get that stuff at Audio Hardware, which is now defunct as well. due both to the pandemic and to flagging interest in DIY audio by the general public who are so severely affected by short attention span syndrome.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2021, 08:28:07 am by Shortsighted »


thouc

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207 species, wow. How many are there in Ontario?


gary yankech

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SS - I noticed your comment re the surplus electronic store outlet!!!  Active Surplus?  Which is not more!!  How about Boeing surplus in Seattle, which i thinks is closed now also.  My husband is an electronics geek, who worked in aerospace and also does it as a hobby.  Needless to say, that is one on the list when we travel, visiting electronic surplus stores, if available. 


Loved the moths pics!!!!!


THank you! Cheers!
Gary Yankech


gary yankech

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207 species, wow. How many are there in Ontario?


207 species is a decent number....I am pretty sure we don't know the exact number of species in Ontario. Northern Ontario is largely unexplored for moths...a friend of mine likely discovered a new species last year. David Beetle, co-author of the Peterson guide to North American moths has seen well over 1000 moths in Ontario. According to the Ontario Moth Atlas, there are approximately 3,300 moth species in Ontario. Though not up to date yet, you can view the atlas here:


https://www.ontarioinsects.org/moth/part2.html


Gary Yankech
Gary Yankech


Bird Brain

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Quote from: gary yankech link=topic=19284.msg75847#msg7584
According to the Ontario Moth Atlas, there are approximately 3,300 moth species.

Gary Yankech
😮 Wow! I can't even identify one!
Jo-Anne :)

"If what you see by the eye doesn't please you, then close your eyes and see from the heart".


gary yankech

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Quote from: gary yankech link=topic=19284.msg75847#msg7584
According to the Ontario Moth Atlas, there are approximately 3,300 moth species.

Gary Yankech
😮 Wow! I can't even identify one!


I'm sure you know a Luna Moth? No?   I know, it's crazy! many are also introduced and/or invasive! About 11,000 in Eastern North America.  It took me many years to learn the ones I've seen....and there are still many more I don't know.  But, knowing what family it might belongs to helps. Cheers! Stay safe.


Gary 
Gary Yankech


Shortsighted

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You may not know all of the moth families but I'm certain you know the best families. Eventually you will come to know the delinquent families once you've crossed paths with a major crime family. I'm not sure which are more invasive.


gary yankech

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You may not know all of the moth families but I'm certain you know the best families. Eventually you will come to know the delinquent families once you've crossed paths with a major crime family. I'm not sure which are more invasive.


Haha...yes, some moths have been down-right "criminal" to crops and such(ie Gypsy moth)...and yes....they are likely many more families that I don't know. Cheers!
Gary Yankech


Shortsighted

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 Gary:

While recently reading “Desert Solitaire” I came across a passage that briefly described the symbiotic relationship that the yucca plant has with a moth from the Genus Pronuba. The moth lays its eggs in the ovary of the yucca flower where the larvae, as they develop, feed on the growing seeds, eating them until maturity but leaving behind a sufficient number of seeds to allow the plant to sow its remaining seeds into the wind. The moth, upon initial arrival, transfers the yucca’s pollen from the anther to pistil thus achieving pollination. Mother Nature can sometimes be discreet. You probably know this already.